RE: serioup problem after running fsck

From: Michael Velez (mikev777_at_hotmail.com)
Date: 03/15/05

  • Next message: linux_at_fritzenwallner.org: "KDE remembers root password for graphical applications"
    To: "'General Red Hat Linux discussion list'" <redhat-list@redhat.com>
    Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2005 13:09:37 -0500
    
    

    I was afraid there would be too many files in the lost+found, given all the
    errors you were getting.

    Anyway, I'm not an expert in recovery and I'm not sure you could recover at
    this point, so what I would recommend is to reinstall (and then always shut
    down properly). However, maybe somebody else on the list could give you
    another opinion.

    If it's not going to be too much of a headache to reinstall, just do that.
    I would. At least, you're sure you're starting with a good operating
    system. Remember to back up any information you need.

    Michael

    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com
    > [mailto:redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Qi, Xlaoyan
    > Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2005 9:44 AM
    > To: General Red Hat Linux discussion list
    > Subject: RE: serioup problem after running fsck
    >
    > Thanks a lot!
    > There are too much files in that "lost+found" directory, so
    > it's hard to tell which is what. I am thinking about to
    > reinstall the OS, is there any suggestions?
    >
    > Appreciate for your help!
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com
    > [mailto:redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Michael Velez
    > Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 5:21 PM
    > To: 'General Red Hat Linux discussion list'
    > Subject: RE: serioup problem after running fsck
    >
    >
    >
    > > -----Original Message-----
    > > From: redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com
    > > [mailto:redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Qi, Xlaoyan
    > > Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 3:07 PM
    > > To: redhat-list@redhat.com
    > > Subject: serioup problem after running fsck
    > >
    > > Hi All,
    > >
    > > When I restarted My linux (Precision 670 work station) with Linux
    > > enterprise version 3 preinstalled this morning, following
    > error shows:
    > >
    > > " Checking root filesystem
    > >
    > > / contains a file system with errors, check forced.
    > >
    > > Eoor reading block 35063145 (Attempt to read block from
    > filesystem
    > > resulted in short read) while reading indirect blocks of inode
    > > 17531077
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > /: UNEXPECTED INCONSISTENCY; RUN fsck manually.
    > >
    > > "
    > >
    > > So I did as shown suggested, run "fsck -y"
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Now I have trouble to get into KDE, only gnome safe can work.
    > > Also "chkconfig -list" and a lot of other commands can not work
    > > either.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > What should I do?
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Thanks for suggestion.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Cynthia
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > --
    > > redhat-list mailing list
    > > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=subscribe
    > > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
    > >
    >
    > I haven't used fsck in over a decade so I'm sure there are
    > better people on this list to answer this question. But here
    > are my two cents.
    >
    > The easiest and first thing is to run fsck again (although I
    > have my doubts that this would help given the errors you
    > have). Running it once is no guarantee that the file system
    > has been completely checked. You need to run it until you no
    > longer get any errors (at least that's how it worked 15 years
    > ago). I once ran fsck 10 times before I had a clean file
    > system and it worked beautifully after that. Fsck should
    > always be run in single user mode.
    >
    > Did you shut down the machine properly the last time you used
    > it? If you did shut down the machine properly the last time,
    > then you may have a disk problem (although I doubt this is it
    > and it's more likely that the machine was not completely shut
    > down before the power was cut). Your vendor must have
    > supplied you with a CD to check the hardware. Before you
    > check anything, back up anything valuable. If you didn't shut
    > down the machine properly, ALWAYS shutdown properly using the
    > shutdown command from the command line or the shutdown menu
    > in KDE (I believe ctl-alt-del will give you the shutdown menu).
    >
    > I don't know what that particular error you have is.
    >
    > But the fact that there are a lot of commands that do not
    > work is scary.
    > If
    > there were only a few or if you only had a few files missing,
    > you could just look in the lost+found directory in '/' and
    > use the 'file' command on any file in the directory to test
    > whether it is an executable or not. If it's a text file, you
    > can use an editor to view the contents of the file and just
    > rename it to the correct file name. If it's an executable,
    > you could just try to execute it and see what happens and
    > then potentially rename it to the correct name.
    >
    > The lost+found directory is used to connect any file that's
    > 'lost' (ie.
    > No
    > longer connected), back to the directory hierarchy. Since it
    > is the directory hierarchy that holds the name of the file,
    > the name of a file in the lost+found directory is actually
    > its inode number (which is how the file system identifies a
    > file). Once you recognize what file you are looking at, you
    > can just rename it to the normal name and place it in the
    > right directory.
    >
    > Anyway, hope this helps.
    > Michael
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > redhat-list mailing list
    > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
    > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
    >
    > --
    > redhat-list mailing list
    > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
    > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
    >

    -- 
    redhat-list mailing list
    unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
    https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
    

  • Next message: linux_at_fritzenwallner.org: "KDE remembers root password for graphical applications"

    Relevant Pages

    • RE: serioup problem after running fsck
      ... serioup problem after running fsck ... guarantee that the file system has been completely checked. ... ALWAYS shutdown properly using the shutdown command from the ...
      (RedHat)
    • Re: lost+found dir placement
      ... It is used by fsck for placing recovered corrupted fs files in there. ... e.g. at boot time, during fs recovery). ... based method (instead of utilizing a file system oriented ... Happy FreeBSD user since 4.0 ...
      (freebsd-questions)
    • RE: serioup problem after running fsck
      ... I haven't used fsck in over a decade so I'm sure there are better people on ... guarantee that the file system has been completely checked. ... ALWAYS shutdown properly using the shutdown command from the ... command line or the shutdown menu in KDE (I believe ctl-alt-del will give ...
      (RedHat)
    • Testing framework
      ... repair and recovery areas. ... trying to determine the effectiveness of fsck. ... Prepare Phase - a new file system is created, ... Corruption Phase - the file system on the disk is corrupted. ...
      (Linux-Kernel)
    • Re: [opensuse] RE: Repairing File Damage or corruption
      ... I understand that the file system is checked for integrity each boot, ... Yes, the command is fsck. ...
      (SuSE)