Re: rpm - failed dependencies - "Perl >= 5.6 needed"

From: Michael C. (mcsuper5_at_usol.com)
Date: 09/26/03


Date: 26 Sep 2003 18:53:37 GMT

On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 19:51:01 -0400,
Cyde Weys <cyde@umd.edu> wrote:
> I'm having a rather annoying problem. I'm running RedHat 9, and the
> main purpose of my computer was to serve a slashcode-based website. To
> install slashcode, you basically have to install Perl from source. I
> went with version 5.8.1. Anyway, now, whenever I try to install an rpm
> package that needs Perl, I get an error like:
>
> error: Failed dependencies:
> perl >= 5.6 is needed by SliMP3-4.2.4-1
>
> If I then try installing it with rpm --nodeps , everything works fine.
> It's kind of annoying to have to run into this often though, and it also
> kills the functionality of Red-Carpet, up2date, etc. Is there a way to
> tell rpm that, yes, I do have Perl installed! Sometimes it even gives
> me the error message, "Need /usr/bin/perl", even though I have that!
> Thanks a lot.
>

Right now I'm using Debian, so I couldn't tell you what files if I
wanted to, but the package manager maintains a database of all rpms that
you have installed. that's why they recomend that if you conpile from
source that you roll your own rpm. I looked at the man pages and
decided I couldn't be bothered. But if you can find the database, you
could edit it to include your version of perl. I'd guess it also
maintains a list of dependencies but I could be mistaken.

If you found the db, you could back it up. Do a make uninstall on the
perl. Install an rpm for perl. Back up the db. Remove the rpm, make
install, and replace the db with the second backup. I have no idea how
badly this would break rpm, if the perl rpm and your source have
identical dependencies it should be okay I'd assume. If you can't even
list rpms restore the original backup.

You'd be safest if you can edit the file yourself and enter no
depencies, or the appropriate depencies. You'll undoubtedly be safer
installing or upgrading rpms than removing them if you break rpm.

Or you could live with it as you suggested.

Michael C.

-- 
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