Re: SSD mystery deepens



On 01/11/2012 03:54 AM, Eef Hartman wrote:
crankypuss<no@xxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
I'm relatively new to linux and don't understand the benefit of the ext4
filesystem over ext2, from a quick look it seems like all it adds is
journaling at the cost of some space-efficiency,

No, that (journalling) and some extra options like directory indexing
is the difference between ext3 and ext2.
Ext4 is completely rewritten, finally adds extends and a LOT of other
fs capabilities (like larger then 8 TB partitions) to ext3.

I'll need to dig around one of these days to really grasp the available filesystems. Aside from support for larger than 8TB partitions, do you still consider ext4 the new go-to system?
.



Relevant Pages

  • Re: [PATCH] Reorder ext4 and ext2 so that ext2 root filesystems are mounted using ext2
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