Re: IDE for C++: KDevelop vs Emacs vs Other

From: Måns Rullgård (mru_at_kth.se)
Date: 03/25/04


Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2004 10:40:47 +0100

Ian Bell <itb@yahoo.com> writes:

> Måns Rullgård wrote:
>
>> Ian Bell <itb@yahoo.com> writes:
>>
>>> Måns Rubeck'srote:
>>>
>>>> "WTH" <spamsucks@Ih8it.com> writes:
>>>>
>>>>>> May I then ask you what it is that leads you to that conclusion?
>>>>>
>>>>> Probably the fact that you espouse the keyboard as the only useful
>>>>> input device for your computer.
>>>>>
>>>>> "Helloooo computer..." "Just use the keyboard." "A keyboard... How
>>>>> 'quaint'..."
>>>>
>>>> I recognize the quote (Star Trek, IIRC), but that's not the sort of
>>>> thing I'm talking about. Voice control would of course be neat, but
>>>> we're not there yet. What I'm talking about is the silliness of
>>>> drawing pictures of buttons on a screen and using a clumsy mouse to
>>>> push them one at a time when there is a perfectly good real keyboard
>>>> waiting to be used.
>>>
>>> That's because it isn't silly. You can put anything you want on a drawn
>>> button so the user can see at a glance what it means/does. Don't know of
>>> a keyboard that can do that.
>>
>> I can't remember ever seeing a GUI button that I knew what it did just
>> from looking at it the first time I saw it.
>
> Cancel, Help, Apply mean nothing to you?

Let me attempt to draw a message box I've seen a few times:

+-----------------------+
| |
| Error saving file |
| |
| [Yes] [No] [Cancel] |
| |
+-----------------------+

Would you kindly explain to me what those three choices will do?

>> Some icons have become somewhat standard for certain operations,
>> but there are always some programs that use them to mean something
>> else, so you anyway have to check first (though it's not obvious
>> how that should be done). Emacs has a very easy way of finding out
>> exactly what a certain key does.
>
> But no easy way of finding the key sequence that does what you want
> it too.

Oh, but it does, see. C-h w runs the command where-is, which prompts
you for the name of a command, and answers with the key binding for
that command. If you can't remember or guess the name of the command,
use C-h a. It lets you search for all command names and explanations
matching a regular expression. Show me one other program that can do
that.

--
Måns Rullgård
mru@kth.se