Re: Make my DNS server public



At Tue, 10 Mar 2009 09:52:16 -0700 (PDT) tash <tdnnash25@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:


I just installed BIND and configured it to resolve
example.mydomain.com

Let's say I named my nameserver ns1.mydomain.com ... How in the world
does the general public (the Internet) get to example.mydomain.com if
they can't resolve ns1.mydomain.com?

So, maybe the more pertinent question is, how do you make
ns1.mydomain.com resolve?

My goal is to not use a 3rd party for any type of DNS service ... is
this possible?

Yes. You need to register your DNS server as a public DNS server. This
means that its IP number gets hard wired someplace on a root DNS server
or the whois database (or something like that). Talk/E-Mail to your
domain registar. I'm assuming that 'mydomain.com' (or whatever your
real domain name is) is registered and that 'ns1.mydomain.com' (or
whatever your real DNS server's name is) is a machine that is live on
the Internet with a static IP address. In *theory* if you do this, you
ought to have at least two *separate* machines available as DNS servers
-- eg a master DNS server and a mirror DNS server slaved to it. This
means that if one machine goes down, the other can keep things going.

Be sure to think this through before you do this. I did this once, but
it was more hassle that I wanted, esp. when I moved my co-location and
the IP number changed. What I do is use everydns.net as my 'public' DNS
servers and slave everydns.net to my ('private') DNS server. This way
I don't have to hassle with updating things on everydns.net and instead
I can update things on my own server and 'push' updates automagically
to everydns.net: sending a SIGHUP to my server sends update notifies to
everydns.net for whatever changed.




--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933
Deepwoods Software -- Download the Model Railroad System
http://www.deepsoft.com/ -- Binaries for Linux and MS-Windows
heller@xxxxxxxxxxxx -- http://www.deepsoft.com/ModelRailroadSystem/

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