Re: Removal of RPM after installing update



Moe Trin wrote:

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On Thu, 3 Apr 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.setup, in
article
<4896971b-9880-4353-9020-aa18644f6529@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>,
sledguy@xxxxxxxxx wrote:

But now I have an older version, 5.8.0 that is still installed which
was installed by RPM. I thought I would just remove it but when I
execute rpm -e without the -nodep qualifier it tells me of all the
packages that are dependant upon it.

You are discovering the problem with package managers. Most of them do
not tolerate someone bypassing them by installing tarballs.

Question is, how do I proceed? Can I simply nuke with rpm -e -nodep
the main perl rpm and leave the others and they will keep working?

No - at the least this will break rpm - never mind other applications
that may want perl.

Or do I need to uninstall them all and install them through cpan or
something similar?

This won't work either.

I have changed all my symlinks to point to 5.8.8 and the programs I
know that use perl (webalizer, spamassassin, openwebmail) are all
running with it just fine.

rpm doesn't look at the binaries, simlinks or anything else. It has
a database of what is installed, and knows all about dependencies.
Try 'man rpm' and look under the 'QUERY OPTIONS'.

If you really have to have version 5.8.8 because it does something
that version 5.8.0 does not (meaning, you are not chasing version
numbers), then your only solution is to build a new rpm on your own.
The easiest way to do this is to locate the existing source rpm for
perl-5.8.0, (probably named something like perl-5.8.0-109.src.rpm)
and install that (stuff gets put into /usr/src/redhat/*/* or similar)
and replace the tarball it contains with your new one. REVIEW the
spec file (probably /usr/src/redhat/SPECS/perl.spec) for needed
changes. Then use rpmbuild to create a new binary package. See the
man pages for each command for more details. You may also wish to
read the RELEASE-NOTES file on the first CD of your original install.

Old guy

I missed the beginning of this, but if there is a version of perl on there
that needs to be removed, "make uninstall" or its equivalent will (or
should) get rid of it for a fresh start.

The O.P. could try installing his present 5.8.8. package with checkinstall:
www.asic-linux.com.mx/~izto/checkinstall/ It is available for most
distros, and will take care of the problems he has faced. I am monitoring
the mailing list, which is very low volume. I have had occasional failures
with it, but it would be better (and far easier) than building one's own
RPM. Try looking for it with your package manager. To use it,
run ./configure and "make" as usual, then instead of "make install"
run "checkinstall" as root.

HTH,

Doug.
.



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