Re: A newbie question - trying to resize a given 15GB vdi file to a bigger one



On Jul 18, 1:18 pm, Aragorn <arag...@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
On Sunday 18 July 2010 10:21 in comp.os.linux.setup, somebody

identifying as tino wrote...
On Jul 17, 2:00 pm, Aragorn <arag...@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

[a whole lot of stuff about partitions and directories]

@Aragorn:

Thank you for taking the time to reply with such a detailed
explanation.

Oh, my pleasure. ;-) I like explaining things into detail. :-)


I must say thank you again..
I find learning from people this way (while of course doing my own
share of learning and trying out things) is beautiful and greatly
appreciated.

I read your answer a few times and still feel each time I reread you
answer, there's additional information I pick up from your lines.
Indeed, there's a lot to learn and understand :)

Well, it all begins with the understanding where GNU/Linux comes from.
Even though it doesn't use a single line of pre-existing code from any
of the proprietary UNIX systems, it *is* a UNIX-family operating
system, and the original AT&T Unix was developed on a mini-computer,
which is a multiuser hardware architecture. And thus, UNIX-family
operating systems are multiuser systems.

Some say that the learning curve to GNU/Linux is pretty steep, but the
truth is that it's only this steep for people who have been conditioned
to expect the behavior of Microsoft Windows, and given that Windows
does not present a computer to the user for what it really is - Windows
is essentially still a single-user operating system with bolted-on
security features - and that it is essentially only a successor to
MS-DOS, people who have been using Windows for a long time without any
knowledge or understanding of other operating systems or operating
system technology - and Windows shields the user from obtaining that
knowledge via the use of Windows itself - will suddenly feel like
they're being overwhelmed by the technical aspects of GNU/Linux.

Just give it some time, and you'll grow to love it soon enough. ;-)

Don't worry, I'm here to stay :)


I am completely new here yet did notice a few of your other answers
here which I learned from as well, even if not always with full
understanding - appreciate it a lot.

Well, let me give you some more advice then, my friend... First of all,
start by not using Google Groups anymore to post to Usenet. Although
Google tries very hard to obscure this, Usenet is *not* a part of
Google and never has been. Google only *archives* Usenet posts and
offers a (very poor) web-based interface for posting to Usenet.

What you need to do, first and foremost, is use a real newsreader and a
real news service. Several ISPs offer a newsserver to their customers,
but more and more are beginning to drop that service because of the
fact that Usenet is becoming less popular and that it is also being
abused for the distribution of copyrighted binary material. Yet, there
are many free newsservers available for posting to text-only groups.

Personally I recommend Eternal September. They do have their occasional
glitches, but in overall they're excellent. Just point your favorite
browser here...

http://www.eternal-september.org

... and register for an account. It's free of charge. They will send
you an e-mail with the login and password to use, and then all you have
to do is use a real newsreader. On GNU/Linux, you can use both GUI
variants - e.g. KNode, Pan - and non-GUI variants - e.g. slrn. There's
also Mozilla Thunderbird, which is an e-mail client but which doubles
as a newsreader. (MS-Outlook Express also does that, from what I've
seen in the headers of some posts - I think it's called Windows Mail
now, but I'm not sure; I don't do Windows. ;-))


Did just that after reading your message :)
Haven't played with it yet, but - soon enough I will..

Then, my advice to you would be that when you see an interesting thread,
mark the thread as one "to be watched" - i.e. you assign a higher score
to it in your newsreader - and follow the discussions, and then copy
the interesting posts in the thread to a dedicated folder in your
newsreader - note: I'm talking of a newsreader folder, not a directory
on your hard disk. ;-)

this one remind me of my silly 'cursor' remark..
I knew it was a cursor, just forgot the word for it in English..


Sometimes it's good to monitor a thread for a while and not save the
posts right away, because someone might be wrong and another person is
then bound to correct him on that. It's the correct information that
you want to save, not the false claims, of course. ;-)

Apart from the functionality, there are also other reasons as to why you
would want to use a real newsreader instead of Google Groups. For
starters, many regular posters filter out posts sent via Google Groups
because of the general cluelessness exhibited by many Google Groups
posters, who are apparently too lazy to look for information on the web
using Google as a search engine. Trolls and spammers also frequently
make use of Google Groups, so filtering out Google Groups tends to keep
the noise-to-signal ratio a little lower.

And thus, as a consequence, if you're posting via Google Groups,
considering that many regulars filter that out, you decrease your
chances of getting useful replies from knowledgeable posters. I am
giving you good advice, my friend: ditch Google Groups and get a real
newsreader and newsserver! ;-)

You may also want to bookmark the following link, albeit that I have to
admit that most of the information here is not exactly up-to-date...:

http://www.tldp.org

And then there's also this one...

http://www.linuxnewbieguide.org


Bookmarked these two under "Aragorn's Refs".. lol

There are loads more websites like these, some better than others.

Just remember: give the penguin some affection and you'll have a pet for
life. :-)

--
*Aragorn*
(registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

appreciate it.

tino


On Jul 18, 1:18 pm, Aragorn <arag...@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
On Sunday 18 July 2010 10:21 in comp.os.linux.setup, somebody

identifying as tino wrote...
On Jul 17, 2:00 pm, Aragorn <arag...@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

[a whole lot of stuff about partitions and directories]

@Aragorn:

Thank you for taking the time to reply with such a detailed
explanation.

Oh, my pleasure. ;-)  I like explaining things into detail. :-)

I read your answer a few times and still feel each time I reread you
answer, there's additional information I pick up from your lines.
Indeed, there's a lot to learn and understand :)

Well, it all begins with the understanding where GNU/Linux comes from.
Even though it doesn't use a single line of pre-existing code from any
of the proprietary UNIX systems, it *is* a UNIX-family operating
system, and the original AT&T Unix was developed on a mini-computer,
which is a multiuser hardware architecture.  And thus, UNIX-family
operating systems are multiuser systems.

Some say that the learning curve to GNU/Linux is pretty steep, but the
truth is that it's only this steep for people who have been conditioned
to expect the behavior of Microsoft Windows, and given that Windows
does not present a computer to the user for what it really is - Windows
is essentially still a single-user operating system with bolted-on
security features - and that it is essentially only a successor to
MS-DOS, people who have been using Windows for a long time without any
knowledge or understanding of other operating systems or operating
system technology - and Windows shields the user from obtaining that
knowledge via the use of Windows itself - will suddenly feel like
they're being overwhelmed by the technical aspects of GNU/Linux.

Just give it some time, and you'll grow to love it soon enough. ;-)

I am completely new here yet did notice a few of your other answers
here which I learned from as well, even if not always with full
understanding - appreciate it a lot.

Well, let me give you some more advice then, my friend...  First of all,
start by not using Google Groups anymore to post to Usenet.  Although
Google tries very hard to obscure this, Usenet is *not* a part of
Google and never has been.  Google only *archives* Usenet posts and
offers a (very poor) web-based interface for posting to Usenet.

What you need to do, first and foremost, is use a real newsreader and a
real news service.  Several ISPs offer a newsserver to their customers,
but more and more are beginning to drop that service because of the
fact that Usenet is becoming less popular and that it is also being
abused for the distribution of copyrighted binary material.  Yet, there
are many free newsservers available for posting to text-only groups.

Personally I recommend Eternal September.  They do have their occasional
glitches, but in overall they're excellent.  Just point your favorite
browser here...

       http://www.eternal-september.org

... and register for an account.  It's free of charge.  They will send
you an e-mail with the login and password to use, and then all you have
to do is use a real newsreader.  On GNU/Linux, you can use both GUI
variants - e.g. KNode, Pan - and non-GUI variants - e.g. slrn.  There's
also Mozilla Thunderbird, which is an e-mail client but which doubles
as a newsreader.  (MS-Outlook Express also does that, from what I've
seen in the headers of some posts - I think it's called Windows Mail
now, but I'm not sure; I don't do Windows. ;-))

Then, my advice to you would be that when you see an interesting thread,
mark the thread as one "to be watched" - i.e. you assign a higher score
to it in your newsreader - and follow the discussions, and then copy
the interesting posts in the thread to a dedicated folder in your
newsreader - note: I'm talking of a newsreader folder, not a directory
on your hard disk. ;-)

Sometimes it's good to monitor a thread for a while and not save the
posts right away, because someone might be wrong and another person is
then bound to correct him on that.  It's the correct information that
you want to save, not the false claims, of course. ;-)

Apart from the functionality, there are also other reasons as to why you
would want to use a real newsreader instead of Google Groups.  For
starters, many regular posters filter out posts sent via Google Groups
because of the general cluelessness exhibited by many Google Groups
posters, who are apparently too lazy to look for information on the web
using Google as a search engine.  Trolls and spammers also frequently
make use of Google Groups, so filtering out Google Groups tends to keep
the noise-to-signal ratio a little lower.  

And thus, as a consequence, if you're posting via Google Groups,
considering that many regulars filter that out, you decrease your
chances of getting useful replies from knowledgeable posters.  I am
giving you good advice, my friend: ditch Google Groups and get a real
newsreader and newsserver! ;-)

You may also want to bookmark the following link, albeit that I have to
admit that most of the information here is not exactly up-to-date...:

       http://www.tldp.org

And then there's also this one...

       http://www.linuxnewbieguide.org

There are loads more websites like these, some better than others.

Just remember: give the penguin some affection and you'll have a pet for
life. :-)

--
*Aragorn*
(registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

.